Explore Your Archives

Launch week this year for the campaign is 17-25 November. Ireland’s launch date is 15 November and the venue the National Library in Dublin. Wales is on 16 November in historic Caernarfon. Scotland kicks off on 21 November at Hutcheson’s school in Glasgow. Last, but not least, Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service launches for England on 24 November.

For more information visit www.exploreyourarchive.org

CFP: Representing Popery in Britain & Ireland, 1520-1900

Representing Popery in Britain & Ireland, 1520-1900

Submission deadline: December 30, 2018

Conference date(s): April 10, 2019 – April 11, 2019

Conference Venue: School of History, Classics, and Archaeology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom

A two-day workshop on the representation of popery in British history (from the Reformation to the close of the nineteenth century) will take place at Newcastle University, 10-11 April 2019. The aims of the workshop are to assess and evaluate the roles that representations of Catholics (and other figures deemed to be ‘popish’) played in political, religious, and social discourse over four centuries of British history. To what extent were these representations reliant upon stereotypes and conspiracy theories? What was the balance between continuity and change in these representations across the centuries? Did each region of the British Isles have distinct traditions of representing popery? And to what extent was popery distinct from Catholicism as a language and/or ideology of politics at various points in British history?

The workshop will not be run via a series of formal papers, but will encourage discussion, exchange and interdisciplinary debate. Historians, art historians, theologians, and literature scholars at all stages of their careers are encouraged to participate in this workshop. If you are interested in contributing, please submit a 300 word abstract of your research interests and how they relate to one of more of the following themes to adam.morton@newcastle.ac.uk by 30 December 2018:

•Defining popery in context

•Representations of Catholics in literature and drama

•Representations of non-Catholics as ‘popish’

•Visual representations of Catholics & popery

•Traditions of representation in Scotland, Wales, Ireland, and England

•Conspiracy Theories

•Stereotypes

•Memory of 1605, 1641, or the 12th.

•Representing the past through anti-Catholicism

•Propaganda and polemic

•Material culture and anti-Catholicism

•Change and continuity in representation of anti-Catholicism

It is expected that proceedings from the workshop will be published at a later date.

The workshop is being organized by ‘Anti-Catholicism in British History c.1520-1900’, a network funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The aim of this network is to outline the history of anti-Catholicism in Britain by focusing on how it contributed to political, cultural, and religious movements during moments of crisis, by tracing the roles which stereotypes and conspiracy theories played in maintaining anti-Catholic ideology, and by assessing the ways in which anti-Catholicism changed across the centuries and how vital this change was to ensuring that it remained a vital part of ‘British’ and ‘Protestant’ identities.

If you would like to join the network or participate in its workshops and events, please send a brief outline of your research interests to adam.morton@newcastle.ac.uk.

CFP: The Church and the Law

English Historical Society Winter Meeting 2018-19: The Church and the Law

Submission deadline: October 31, 2018

Conference date(s): January 12, 2019

Conference Venue: Ecclesiastical History Society, Malet Street, United Kingdom

This theme addresses the legal issues and legal consequences underlying relations between secular and religious authorities in the context of the Christian church, from its earliest emergence within Roman Palestine as a persecuted minority sect through to the period when it became legally recognised within the Roman empire, its many institutional manifestations in East and West throughout the middle ages, the reconfigurations associated with the Reformation and Counter- Reformation, the legal and constitutional complications (such as in Reformation England or Calvin’s Geneva), and the variable consequences of so-called secularisation thereafter. On many occasions in recent years, moreover, we have been confronted with contemporary discrepancies, contradictions, and even rejection of secular laws, modern social mores or social attitudes. What were the legal consequences and implications of the Reformation, (including the confiscation and restitution of property), of the French wars of religion; the French Revolution; the political transformations of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? Are there particular influences on the formation of ecclesiastical law (the Bible, Roman law, national law codes)? The engagement of secular and religious authorities with the law and what that law actually comprised (Roman law, canon law, national laws, state and royal edicts) are further issues to be addressed. This is also a theme that requires the examination of the formation of bodies of law and how and why it became recognised as law. The formation of canon law is a case in point. There is also the problem of definition. How early, for example, can a ‘code of canon law’ be defined, and what are the processes by which opinion and conciliar decision became perceived as ‘law’? What light does the transmission and reception of ‘canon law’ throw on such questions?

Delegates are encouraged to range widely within the theme. Possible case studies might include:

–  court cases
–  legal challenges to authority
–  discussions of legal culture and legal practice
–  legally orchestrated clashes between secular and ecclesiastical law
–  legal documents of many kinds

For more information see: https://www.history.ac.uk/ehsoc/ehs-winter-meeting-2018-19-church-and-law

British & Irish Sound Archives conference

The annual British & Irish Sound Archives (BISA) conference will take place this year at the National Library of Wales in beautiful Aberystwyth from 16-17 November.

Online registration is open for this year’s conference. Places are limited! To find details on how to register, see www.bisa-web.org/next-event

Besides a fascinating set of presentations, a tour of the Welsh screen and sound archive, and excellent opportunities to network and meet friends and colleagues from audiovisual institutions, the library is set in a stunning location, overlooking the town of Aberystwyth and Cardigan Bay. And this year there is a separate full day of training on audio archiving, on Thursday 15 November.

The BISA registration fees have been kept as low as possible, and the National Library of Wales have graciously provided use of their auditorium and other facilities.

Both events can be booked on the same registration form. Registration fees should be paid on arrival at the Library.

BISA formed in 2006 as a forum to celebrate and share knowledge on the care and promotion of sound collections throughout the British Isles. Their annual conference is a great opportunity for anyone passionate about sound heritage to share skills, enthusiasm, special interests and experience.

Archives Revealed Cataloguing Grants

Archives Revealed Cataloguing Grants: Round 2 open for applications
The second round of the Archives Revealed Cataloguing Grants programme is now open for applications. Archives Revealed Cataloguing Grants is a funding programme supporting the cataloguing of archive collections across the UK. The programme aims to support archives services to make their uncatalogued archive collections accessible and available to all.
Archives Revealed Cataloguing Grants is funded by the National Archives, The Pilgrim Trust and the Wolfson Foundation.
Further information, new guidance and FAQs and the link to the online application form are available on the website:
Anyone considering applying is strongly encouraged to contact the teams to discuss your project before submitting an application form. Please email us on archivesrevealed@nationalarchives.gov.uk to arrange an appointment at a convenient time.
The deadline for applications to phase 1 in this round will be Friday 7th December 2018.
Please get in touch with the Archives Revealed team for further information and support about the Archives Revealed programme.