The Centre for Catholic Studies’ Book Launch Series 2020-21

Starting out with ‘English Convents in Catholic Europe,
c.1600-1800′ Co-hosted by the Durham University Centre for Catholic Studies and Institute of Medieval and Early Modern Studies Wednesday 7 October 2020 5.30-6.45pm BST, by Zoom.

To register for zoom and get full details of the book launch series see the CCS website: https://www.dur.ac.uk/theology.religion/ccs/events/booklaunchseries/

Resources for reopening Archives

The ‘Re-opening The National Archives’ webinar, which was streamed live last week, is now online: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYcaUJL3gd4.

This webinar provides information for colleagues in the archive sector on The National Archives’ own approach to re-opening.

Each archive service needs to be guided by their own circumstances in relation to re-opening; in order to help with this, please do have a look at our webpages on ‘Making Plans for Re-opening’ for high level principles, information on re-opening in relation to being a place of deposit and/or an accredited archive service, and resources including a planning for re-opening checklist and risk management template.

CAS Council updated

At a recent Council meeting Jonathan Bush was elected as new Chair of the Catholic Archives Society. He thanked his predecessor, Judith Smeaton, for all her efforts and hard work.

As several Council members’ terms had ended, three new members were co-opted. They are Claire Marsland, Naomi Johnson and Jenny Smith.

The full Council list is now as follows:

Officers                                                                             

Chair: Johnathan Bush

Vice Chair: currently vacant

Treasurer: Jim Hughes

Secretary: Karen O’Connor

Council members

Annaig Boyer

Judith Smeaton

Lawrence Gregory

Claire Marsland (co-opted)

Naomi Johnson (co-opted)

Jenny Smith (co-opted)

Timeline of the history of the Society of the Sacred Heart – Barbara Vesey Provincial Archivist

Plans to create an online timeline of the history of the Society of the Sacred Heart began in 2016, as part of the planned celebrations for 2017 around the 175th anniversary of the Society’s presence in the UK. A teaching order of nuns, the Society was founded in France in 1800 by Madeleine Sophie Barat, who was canonised as St Madeleine Sophie in 1925. A group of seven nuns came over to Britain from France in 1842, establishing schools for Catholic girls in England, Scotland and Ireland (then part of the UK). The first school in England was at Berrymead Manor, Acton, London; in 1850 this school relocated to Roehampton, where it remained until the Second World War, when it moved again, this time to Woldingham. In its place on the grounds at Roehampton a tertiary college established by the Society was relocated from central London and renamed Digby Stuart College after the two English nuns, Mabel Digby and Janet Erskine Stuart, who had been Superiors General of the international Society. This college remains to this day, and is now one of the four constituent colleges that make up the University of Roehampton. The nuns of the Society have the appellation ‘RSCJ’ for ‘réligieuse du Sacré Coeur de Jésus’, the French for ‘women religious of the Sacred Heart of Jesus’.


Find out more on the creation of the timeline here: https://aralearning.wordpress.com/2020/04/24/timeline-of-the-history-of-the-society-of-the-sacred-heart-barbara-vesey-provincial-archivist/